In The News

Kyla Lee in Global News: RCMP investigating after officer leaves his 4 young children alone in car

Four young children were found left alone in a vehicle in a downtown Vancouver parkade on Wednesday afternoon.
Global BC reporter Rumina Daya was in a parkade beneath the law courts when she heard the muffled sound of a baby crying.

She followed the sound to an SUV and saw four young children — including a baby — inside the vehicle. All the kids appeared to be under the age of seven, Daya said.

There were no adults around and the door to the SUV was unlocked.​

Kyla Lee in Global News: RCMP investigating after officer leaves his 4 young children alone in car Read More »

Kyla Lee on Global News BC: Driver given $109 traffic ticket for head-on crash that killed motorcyclist in Delta

The family of a motorcyclist killed in Delta are outraged that the driver behind the accident walked away with nothing more than a traffic ticket. Rumina Daya has more.

Carmen Smith had been married for just five days when her husband was killed in a crash.

“I had sympathy cards mixed with wedding cards on my mantel,” she said.

Brad Smith died when a car crossed the centre line and hit him as he was riding his motorcycle. The driver of the car was given a ticket of just over $100.

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Kyla Lee on Global News BC: Driver given $109 traffic ticket for head-on crash that killed motorcyclist in Delta Read More »

Kyla Lee on CFAX 1070: changes to drunk driving legislation

Kyla Lee spoke to Mark Brennae about proposed changes to drunk driving legislation.

The Provincial Government has included some changes to alcohol-impaired driving provisions in a new law addressing cannabis-impaired driving.

Ms. Lee described the alterations as “disturbing”.

Kyla Lee on CFAX 1070: changes to drunk driving legislation Read More »

Kyla Lee Nominated for Canadian Lawyer Magazine’s Top 25 Most Influential

As strange as it feels to write a blog post about myself, I suppose there is no harm in writing that I’ve been nominated for Canadian Lawyer Magazine’s Top 25 Most Influential Lawyers. You can see the list of many deserving nominees at the link, and vote in five separate categories.

I was nominated in the Young Influencer category, which recognizes young lawyers who have had a particular influence on the law or the profession in the past year to year and a half. Although I do not feel like a young lawyer any longer, I really have not been a lawyer that long. However, in my almost six years of practice I have had the opportunity to testify before two parliamentary committees and the Senate as an expert witness in criminal law. I have a significant number of reported decisions in the area of administrative law, Immediate Roadside Prohibition, and criminal law.

Heck, I changed the law in relation to disclosure applications in drug trials recently.

So I guess I have had some influence, in a small way.

I doubt I’ll be selected when up against so many distinguished and far more deserving candidates. But it is an honour to be nominated. And I would totally solicit votes if you want to vote for me.

Kyla Lee Nominated for Canadian Lawyer Magazine’s Top 25 Most Influential Read More »

Kyla Lee: “One of the leading lawyers” regarding marijuana laws

In spite of trail-blazing by several U.S. states, Solicitor General Mike Farnworth seems intent on turning B.C.’s journey to cannabis legalization — a bright future of jobs, tax windfalls and the end of pernicious prosecutions — from a good trip into a bummer.

The sprawling omnibus legislation the top cop tabled Thursday in the legislature continued the mishandling by both senior levels of government of the transition from nearly a century of enforcing a criminal prohibition to a marijuana-friendly economy.

Kyla Lee: “One of the leading lawyers” regarding marijuana laws Read More »

Kyla Lee on The Lynda Steele Show: A court ruling today could lead to thousands of 24 hour driving prohibitions being voided

A court ruling today could lead to the quashing of thousands of 24 hour drug impaired driving prohibitions. BC’s Supreme Court has ruled that police officers cannot introduce 24 hour prohibitions for drugs to drivers at police stations – or anywhere else that’s not at the roadside.

Kyla Lee said: “It’s a ruling related to 24 hour prohibitions for drugs which are often issued in the cases of cannabis impaired driving. It essentially limits the authority of police officers to issue them to only at the roadside. Typically what we’ve been seeing is that police officers will do their roadside investigation, arrest a person, take them back to the detachment for further testing and on completion of that testing, give them the prohibition. The court ruled today that that’s not lawful.”

Listen to the full interview here.

Kyla Lee on The Lynda Steele Show: A court ruling today could lead to thousands of 24 hour driving prohibitions being voided Read More »

Kyla Lee on Local First News: Thousands of 24 hour driving prohibitions may now be overturned

The BC Supreme Court has ruled today that police officers can only issue 24 hour drug impaired driving prohibitions at the roadside and nowhere else.
“It has the potential to have 24 hour prohibitions removed from thousands of people’s driving record.”
Acumen Law’s Kyla Lee says it all stems from a ruling today.

Kyla Lee on Local First News: Thousands of 24 hour driving prohibitions may now be overturned Read More »

Kyla Lee Interviewed on Global News: Province to crack down on ‘deadbeat’ parents

The B.C. government has introduced new legislation that would allow ICBC to cancel the driver’s licence of someone who owes more than $3,000 in child support payments.

Currently, the Family Maintenance Enforcement Program (FMEP) can ask ICBC to refuse to issue or renew a driver’s licence of someone with substantial arrears.

The FMEP will only cancel licences if someone is ignoring requests to pay support payments or set up a payment plan.

Kyla Lee Interviewed on Global News: Province to crack down on ‘deadbeat’ parents Read More »

“Don’t use saliva testing to prove or disprove impaired driving from cannabis: lawyer”

How do you effectively test if someone is impaired when it comes to marijuana?  This is a question that needs to be answered ahead of legalization but with legalization only a few months away.  One of the things that is being floated as a potential idea is saliva tests taken from drivers to detect the presence of drugs.  Our next guest says that this will not work.

Kyla Lee said: “My biggest concern around saliva testing is that the pilot projects that have been done both by the federal government and the Canadian Society of Forensic Science have not found that these devices should be used to impose significant administrative sanctions. 

“The Canadian Society of Forensic Science actually recommended not to use them except to impose very short term consequences because they don’t show a level of impairment and because there is a bout a 7% rate of false positives.”

“Don’t use saliva testing to prove or disprove impaired driving from cannabis: lawyer” Read More »

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