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Weird and Wacky Wednesdays: Volume 158

Weird and Wacky Wednesdays often raises more questions than anything. It’s not my expectation that people come here each Wednesday for answers – I get that. This week is, perhaps, an extreme example. And the questions this week are all about litigation (rather than foolish criminal behaviour). We start with a strange tactical litigation decision concerning an appeal and move on to a lawsuit that you don’t want on your shoes. Finally, we’ll close it off with the story of a lawyer in trouble.

Pitfalls of Self-Representation in Traffic Court

Traffic court is a very confusing and often frightening place for self-represented litigants. Unfortunately, that can sometimes result in people being taken advantage of by police officers who are trained in the law and rules of evidence in traffic court. It can also result in people not knowing when the court is making a legally incorrect ruling.

A recent BC Supreme Court traffic ticket appeal case demonstrates some of the pitfalls of being unrepresented in a system that can feel stacked against you.

Weird and Wacky Wednesdays: Volume 157

This week on Weird and Wacky Wednesdays, we look at the case of someone who is taking the “make it Lego” fad a little too far. Like, way too far. Then, we look at what happens when you make the wrong inquiries about using wifi. Lastly, we examine the case of a very explosive toilet visit.

Follow the jump to learn more about this week’s weirdest and wackiest legal cases from around the globe!

Weird and Wacky Wednesdays: Volume 156

We’ve seen a lot of bad driving during the pandemic – something few of us would have predicted, but now that restrictions are loosening up, many are getting ready to take to the skies.

This week we’ll start on the ground with a darn fine freedom of expression driving case and then we’ll look to two stories about people wanting to take to the skies, one funny and one, well… we’ll warn you first because although it’s instructive, it’s also sad.

Follow the jump to read more of this week’s weirdest and wackiest legal cases.

Weird and Wacky Wednesdays: Volume 155

This week on Weird and Wacky Wednesdays, we look at three cases of fast food follies. The first involves a drunk driving incident at a fast food restaurant. Then, we look at other crazy behaviour over dipping sauce. Finally, we examine a totally ridiculous way to react to a spicy chicken sandwich.

Follow the jump to learn more about this week’s weirdest and wackiest legal cases from around the globe!

Weird and Wacky Wednesday: Volume 154

This week on Weird and Wacky Wednesdays, we septuagenarian serial pooper. Then, we learn about a couple that put the ‘play’ in ‘playground’. Finally, we hear the tragic story of a New York socialite, struggling to survive on $79,000 a month.

Follow the jump to learn more about this week’s Weirdest and Wackiest legal cases from around the globe!

Weird and Wacky Wednesdays: Volume 153

This week on Weird and Wacky Wednesdays, we look at the case of what happens when there’s a … oh, you’ll find out. Then, we look at why you shouldn’t be a jerk when you are extremely wealthy. Finally, we examine how not to dig yourself into a deeper hole after a Zoom mishap in court.

Follow the jump to learn more about this week’s Weirdest and Wackiest legal cases from around the globe!

Weird and Wacky Wednesdays: Volume 152

This week on Weird and Wacky Wednesdays we look at the case of a missing man found in a very unlikely place. Then, we examine what happens when a pizza delivery goes wrong. Finally, we look at an unusual discovery during a beach walking the UK.

Follow the jump to read more about this week’s weirdest and wackiest legal cases from around the globe!

Admissibility of Evidence in Random Traffic Stops

Random traffic stops are permitted in some cases

Section 9 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects everyone’s right not to be arbitrarily detained or imprisoned. The police cannot randomly pull you over, for example. When it comes to driving, however, there are some important qualifications. Random traffic stops are permitted if they are for the purpose of enforcing highway safety laws. The infringement is seen as being justified because effective law enforcement is in the interests of public safety.

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